Dr. Jean Marshall recognized for “distinguished scientific leadership”

The Canadian Society for Immunology (CSI) has chosen AllerGen Research Leader Dr. Jean Marshall to receive its top honour—the Bernhard Cinader Award for “distinguished scientific leadership and accomplishments in immunology.” The CSI bestows the award annually upon a Canadian immunologist

Trainee awarded two fellowships for CHILD research

AllerGen trainee Dr. Kozeta Miliku, MD, PhD, has been offered two postdoctoral fellowships to support her CHILD-based research into the relationship between breastfeeding and lung health. Dr. Miliku has accepted a one-year Breathing as One Research Fellowship from the Canadian

AllerGen colleagues bid a fond farewell to Dr. Frances Silverman

Dr. Frances Silverman, Associate Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto, and world-renowned expert on the health effects of air pollutants and the role they play in the development of inflammation, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, December 11, 2018, at her home

Government phasing out NCE program

On December 6, 2018, the federal government of Canada announced that the Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) program—the program that has supported AllerGen since 2005—will be phased-out over the next several years. “The NCE has been a ground-breaking program

Graduate Student Research Awards continue to support exceptional students

Asthma Canada and AllerGen are pleased to announce the 2018-2019 Asthma Canada / AllerGen Graduate Student Research Award recipients within Asthma Canada’s National Research Program. L to R: Xiaoshu Cao (University of Toronto), Ryan Huff (The University of British Columbia),

Is food allergy a legal disability and how does this affect Canadian schools?

Artwork: Sean Caulfield In the Canadian legal context, food allergy is considered a disability that must be accommodated by schools. However, food bans are not legally required, according to the conclusions of a new AllerGen study published in Allergy, Asthma

Few outgrow seafood allergies

New AllerGen-supported research suggests that people allergic to fish and shellfish do not usually outgrow these allergies. Published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, the study used data collected by survey and by accessing medical records

National food policy plan overlooks food allergy—commentary

Why are 50% of Canadian households—those affected by food allergy, either directly or indirectly—ignored in a national food policy plan to address healthy living and safe food? The question is raised in a new Canadian Food Studies commentary by AllerGen

AllerGen’s Scientific Director receives CSACI’s Jerry Dolovich Award

“Dr. Judah Denburg is an amazing colleague, clinician, researcher and, to a large degree, visionary, and it is extremely fitting that he is being honoured with the Jerry Dolovich Award,” observed Dr. Allan Becker, as he announced the honour at

Breastfeeding may protect against obesity in early life

New CHILD Study research has found that infants who are breastfed have a reduced risk of being overweight in the first year of life—and that the protective association is stronger with longer and more exclusive breastfeeding. “We found that the

Study sheds light on how the immune system “remembers” food allergens

An AllerGen-supported research team at McMaster University is studying why the body’s immune system responds inappropriately to certain foods and why some food allergies are lifelong. A food allergy is an abnormal immune response to a food. The immune system

Household cleaners may cause obesity in young children

Killing germs around the house may have an impact on young childrens’ waistlines. The connection? The infant gut microbiome, according to a study led by AllerGen investigator Dr. Anita Kozyrskyj (University of Alberta). “Infants living in households where disinfectants are

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