Category: Publications/Research updates

New research from the CHILD Cohort Study shows that frequent exposure to common household cleaning products can increase a child’s risk of developing asthma. The study was published today in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. It found that young infants …

Baby’s exposure to cleaning products can increase asthma risk Read More »

A mother’s exposure to traffic-related air pollution during the first three months of pregnancy is associated with an increase in her child’s risk of having allergic sensitization by age one, according to CHILD Cohort Study research published in the Journal …

Air pollution exposure in early pregnancy linked to infants’ risk of developing allergies Read More »

New research from the CHILD Cohort Study involving more than 1,500 infants has shed light on the gut bacterium Clostridioides difficile and its association with the type of feeding in early life. The study, published in the journal Frontiers in …

Type of feeding affects C. difficile presence in babies Read More »

Children who do not consume peanut during their first year of life are more likely to be allergic to peanut at age three, according to new findings from the CHILD Cohort Study. The study, published in The Journal of Allergy …

Even infants at low risk of peanut allergy should eat peanut early Read More »

New findings from the CHILD Cohort Study shed light on the diverse factors that influence human milk fatty acid composition. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that the amount and mixture of breast milk fats …

Fats in breastmilk are unique to each mother Read More »

A new Canadian study concludes that the procedure known as an oral food challenge (OFC), considered the “gold standard” of food allergy testing, faces several barriers preventing its widespread implementation. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical …

“Gold standard” food allergy test faces implementation barriers that targeted educational strategies may address Read More »

A new study led by AllerGen researcher Dr. Moshe Ben-Shoshan suggests that treatment guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in children should be reassessed, and shows that pre-hospital treatment with epinephrine has the greatest protective effect against uncontrolled allergic reactions. The research, …

Guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in children need an update Read More »

AllerGen researchers, together with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have demonstrated that an immune cell previously thought to be involved in maintaining lifelong food allergies is likely not the culprit after all. The research, published in the Journal of Allergy …

New blood test may let food allergy suspect off the hook Read More »

New research co-authored by researchers out of McMaster University suggests that the risks of oral immunotherapy (OIT) as a treatment for peanut allergy are greater than the risks associated with avoiding peanuts. Dr. Derek Chu, a fellow in clinical immunology …

Allergic to peanuts? Avoidance is safest: new study Read More »

Research from the CHILD Cohort Study suggests that among preschoolers, spending two hours or more of screen time per day may be linked to clinically significant behavioural problems. “We found that screen time had a significant impact on behaviour at …

Screen time associated with behavioural problems in preschoolers Read More »

Diesel exhaust from which tiny particles have been filtered out may be more harmful to the lung function of people with allergies than unfiltered exhaust. This may be due to the fact that some particle-depletion technologies, such as diesel exhaust …

Filtered diesel exhaust worse for allergy-affected lungs than unfiltered Read More »

New research from AllerGen’s CHILD Cohort Study has found that babies sleep less at three months of age if their mothers do not have a university degree, experienced depression during pregnancy or had an emergency cesarean-section delivery. “Sleep affects a …

Infant sleep duration associated with mother’s level of education, prenatal depression and method of delivery Read More »