Anaphylaxis study finds reactions to food common among children despite adult supervision

“I think we have a false sense of security that as long as our food-allergic child is at home under the supervision of an adult we know, the child will be fine; but apparently, that isn’t the case,” says AllerGen

New ResearchSKETCH: Saliva contains a novel molecule for measuring stress

A salivary protein called “Calcium-binding protein spermatid-specific 1,” or CABS1, has the potential to be a reliable, accurate marker of stress. AllerGen HQP Eduardo Reyes-Serratos wants you to know more about this discovery, which emerged from research he participated in

AllerGen researchers profiled for CIHR 150

In recognition of Canada’s 150th anniversary, the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) is “celebrating health research” by sharing the stories of Canadian researchers and patients. The CIHR website now profiles the work of numerous AllerGen researchers and HQP. Click

C-CARE: Anaphylaxis in kids occurs despite adult supervision

At least a third of reactions in children with food-induced anaphylaxis to a known allergen occur under adult supervision, according to new research led by AllerGen researchers using data from AllerGen’s nationwide Cross-Canada Anaphylaxis REgistry (C-CARE). The study, published in

Asthma in infant boys may eventually be preventable

A new study leveraging CHILD Study data shows that the family risk for asthma—typically passed from moms to babies—may not be a result of genetics alone: it may also involve the microbes found in a baby’s digestive tract. AllerGen investigator

Study finds asthma & food allergies predictable at age 1

A press release issued by The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (JACI) highlights new findings from AllerGen’s CHILD Study that will help doctors better predict which children will develop asthma and allergies. Analyzing data from more than 2,300 children

Stress in pregnancy may affect a baby’s immune system

Infants born to mothers experiencing distress may be at a higher risk of developing allergic disease, according to new findings published online in Brain, Behavior and Immunity. The study analyzed data from 403 infants and their mothers participating in AllerGen’s

Asthma risk lower with direct breastfeeding: CHILD Study

Direct breastfeeding in the first three months of life appears to provide more protection against childhood asthma than either infant formula or expressed breastmilk, according to new findings from AllerGen’s CHILD Study. The researchers analyzed data from 2,534 infants who

New genetic clue to peanut allergy

AllerGen researchers have pinpointed a new gene associated with peanut allergy. The gene, c11orf30/EMSY, is already known to play a role in other allergy-related conditions, such as eczema, asthma, and allergic rhinitis. This study is the first to associate the

Dr. Brett Finlay inducted into Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

AllerGen investigator Dr. Brett Finlay (The University of British Columbia) is one of six 2018 inductees to the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame. Laureates of this honour are individuals whose contributions to medicine and the health sciences have led to

CIC-tested biologic poised to become a “game-changing, blockbuster” asthma drug

In 2014, AllerGen’s Clinical Investigator Collaborative (CIC) conducted an early Phase II clinical trial on the injectable biologic drug tezepelumab, developed by MedImmune (the biologics arm of AstraZeneca) and Amgen, and first identified the drug’s significant therapeutic potential. “Now, it’s

AllerGen researcher featured in CIHR breastfeeding panel

On August 2, 2017, AllerGen investigator Dr. Meghan Azad (University of Manitoba) participated in a panel discussion organized by the CIHR’s Institute of Human Development, Child & Youth Health (IHDCYH) on breastfeeding and children’s health. In the event, Dr. Azad

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