Category: Food allergy

Is food allergy a legal disability and how does this affect Canadian schools?

In the Canadian legal context, food allergy is considered a disability that must be accommodated by schools. However, food bans are not legally required, according to the conclusions of a new AllerGen study published in Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology.

Few outgrow seafood allergies

New AllerGen-supported research suggests that people allergic to fish and shellfish do not usually outgrow these allergies. Published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, the study used data collected by survey and by accessing medical records

National food policy plan overlooks food allergy—commentary

Why are 50% of Canadian households—those affected by food allergy, either directly or indirectly—ignored in a national food policy plan to address healthy living and safe food? The question is raised in a new Canadian Food Studies commentary by AllerGen

Study sheds light on how the immune system “remembers” food allergens

An AllerGen-supported research team at McMaster University is studying why the body’s immune system responds inappropriately to certain foods and why some food allergies are lifelong. A food allergy is an abnormal immune response to a food. The immune system

AllerGen researchers launch food allergy app for youth

Kung Food, a food allergy app for youth and teens that was developed with AllerGen support, is now available in the Mac App Store and on Google Play. The mobile application aims to improve the knowledge and skills of youth

Epinephrine underused during anaphylaxis outside of hospital

“It’s a disappointing reality that epinephrine is seriously underused during an anaphylactic reaction, even when it is carried,” says AllerGen investigator Dr. Moshe Ben-Shoshan (Montreal Children’s Hospital and the Research Institute of McGill University Health Centre). A new study, led

Breastmilk sugars known as HMOs may help prevent food allergies

Findings from AllerGen’s CHILD Study indicate that complex sugars in breastmilk, known as human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), may reduce the risk of babies later developing food allergies. “Our research has identified a ‘beneficial’ HMO profile that was associated with a

Food Allergy Canada promotes improved management of food allergies on campus

On September 15, 2015, the second day of her first year of university, 18-year-old Andrea Mariano died of an anaphylactic reaction after consuming a smoothie that she bought on campus. In response to this tragedy, AllerGen’s legacy partner Food Allergy

Review paper from Jordana-Waserman lab tackles Th2 sensitivity

Foods that are harmless to most people may trigger anaphylaxis—a sudden, life-threatening reaction—in sensitized (or allergic) individuals. DrS Manel Jordana and Susan Waserman, AllerGen investigators and professors at McMaster University, are trying to find out what causes the body’s immune

Chatelaine shares AllerGen, CHILD food allergy research results

A new article in Chatelaine magazine highlights the latest developments in the fight against food allergies, providing national exposure for AllerGen investigators, trainees, partner organizations and AllerGen-supported food allergy research. “How Close Are We to a Cure for Food Allergies?”

New CHILD research: Can breastfeeding help prevent food allergies?

Dr. Meghan Azad (University of Manitoba) and Dr. Jean Marshall (Dalhousie University) have been awarded over $742,000 from CIHR to support CHILD Study research on how breastfeeding can help prevent food allergies. “It is well recognized that breastfeeding is beneficial

Anaphylaxis study finds reactions to food common among children despite adult supervision

“I think we have a false sense of security that as long as our food-allergic child is at home under the supervision of an adult we know, the child will be fine; but apparently, that isn’t the case,” says AllerGen

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